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“Without [the changes] we wouldn’t have moved forward”: FURIA’s consistency prevails despite deep roster moves

Charlotte will be FURIA’s fifth consecutive international event.

Image via Ubisoft/@itsmeERROR

Heading to the final weekend of the Brasileirão in ninth place, FURIA Esports’ chances to qualify for the Copa Elite Six were quite small. Just three days later, the panthers skyrocketed to fourth after three back-to-back wins, forcing their way in the Copa Elite Six and, at a later date, the Charlotte Major.

Although the situation looked critical from the outside, the lineup was aware of its potential. “We just played our game, we had a pretty good mindset,” explained Luiz “Miracle” Abrantes.

Consistency is key. It might sound cliché, but FURIA’s pace has always followed the same line. Brazil is a top-flight region packed of not only the most experienced cores but also the most thriving youth, which arguably makes the Brasileirão the toughest regional league in the scene. However, despite not standing out, the panthers always manage to survive in the jungle.

As a result of this consistency, FURIA Esports has competed in every international Siege event since May 2021, making it through every group stage except for the Sweden Major, where the team was drawn in a group with DWG KIA, Spacestation Gaming, and Team Empire. 

All of these results, situations, and experiences forged FURIA Esports’ core. However, despite the team’s consistency and international qualifications, the roster made two changes as Thiago “handy” Sá Ferreira and Willian “Stk” da Costa joined the lineup. 

Why make transfers if the roster was working? Well, the Brazilians had hit the ceiling. International qualifications and early playoff eliminations were the maximum the team had to offer. The team had to find solutions at some point, and that meant changes.

“The changes were made thinking that the team that we were at the time we thought that was the maximum we were going to get, without that [the changes] we wouldn’t have moved forward than the spots we were getting in Majors and Six Invitationals,” explained Miracle.

“They were good players, LENDA and highs, I am good friend with them, so the changes were made thinking about that, they were good players but we needed great players, we were aiming for something bigger, being champions and that, we thought that we wouldn’t get (there) with that team,” he concluded.

FURIA Esports’ start to the season was very questionable, obtaining just one point in the first three matches. For Miracle, that was just an issue of pressure. “[The] two new players were trying to prove themselves, me R4re, and Fntzy were also trying to prove ourselves because we stayed in the team, we were putting a lot of pressure [on ourselves].”

Once the team figured out what was happening, and after understanding each other, FURIA Esports’ consistency was back. The team won five of the last six matches, including maximum overtime victories over Ninjas in Pyjamas and FaZe Clan.

In the Copa Elite Six, it was about surviving to the South American and Mexican rosters, which wasn’t an easy task for FURIA. In the final game for a spot at Charlotte, the team struggled against the Argentinian side Pampas, as they defeated the Brazilians on Club by 7-2.

“We couldn’t handle their aggression, we were not playing our game. On the second map, we resetted, play our game. We had nothing to lose. Theme Park, we were just confident we would win,” said Miracle.

FURIA Esports now heads to Charlotte as one of the rosters with the most experience behind its back, but at the same time trying to find the team’s Siege. “I think [experience] is going to be very important, because we have learned a lot in the previous championships, we are going to help the new boys [that] there’s nothing to be afraid of, you are also playing against new people too,” concluded Miracle.